Everything

stephenrahn:

M13 - Globular Cluster in Hercules. I did not use a telescope for this shot. I just used a Canon 60Da with a 135mm lens. This is a single three-minute exposure. #astrophotography #astronomy #messier #canon #space #science #stars #oriontelescopes

stephenrahn:

M13 - Globular Cluster in Hercules. I did not use a telescope for this shot. I just used a Canon 60Da with a 135mm lens. This is a single three-minute exposure. #astrophotography #astronomy #messier #canon #space #science #stars #oriontelescopes

(via astronemma)

spacettf:

NGC7000北美星雲及IC 5070/IC5067鵜鶘星雲 by tak530 on Flickr.
spacettf:

UGC 11651 by geckzilla on Flickr.

spacettf:

UGC 11651 by geckzilla on Flickr.

just—space:

The “Eye of Sauron Nebula” (ESO 456-67) [1600x1600]

just—space:

The “Eye of Sauron Nebula” (ESO 456-67) [1600x1600]

just—space:

A Laser Strike at the Galactic Center [2000x1816]

just—space:

A Laser Strike at the Galactic Center [2000x1816]

beautyandtheuniverse:

Jupiter’s largest moon, Ganymede

beautyandtheuniverse:

Jupiter’s largest moon, Ganymede

(via fuckyeahcelestialthings)

fuckyeahcelestialthings:

just—space:

Reflection Nebula in Ophiuchius [1598×1200]

fuckyeahcelestialthings:

just—space:

Reflection Nebula in Ophiuchius [1598×1200]

brightestofcentaurus:

Messier 81
Messier 81 is a grand design spiral galaxy located about 11.6 million light years away towards the constellation Ursa Major, the Great Bear. Its spiral arms trace beautifully all the way to its center core, the hallmark of a grand design galaxy.
The arms contain many younger, blue stars formed in the past few million years, along with a population of stars formed in a period of star formation starting about 600 million years ago. The core contains older, redder stars, and is much larger than our Milky Way’s central bulge. The central black hole is also larger than our galaxy’s, about 15 times so. Research has shown that the size of the central black hole is proportional to the mass of the central bulge.
Image from NASA, information from ESA.

brightestofcentaurus:

Messier 81

Messier 81 is a grand design spiral galaxy located about 11.6 million light years away towards the constellation Ursa Major, the Great Bear. Its spiral arms trace beautifully all the way to its center core, the hallmark of a grand design galaxy.

The arms contain many younger, blue stars formed in the past few million years, along with a population of stars formed in a period of star formation starting about 600 million years ago. The core contains older, redder stars, and is much larger than our Milky Way’s central bulge. The central black hole is also larger than our galaxy’s, about 15 times so. Research has shown that the size of the central black hole is proportional to the mass of the central bulge.

Image from NASA, information from ESA.

(via fuckyeahcelestialthings)

spacettf:

UGC 11131 by geckzilla on Flickr.

spacettf:

UGC 11131 by geckzilla on Flickr.

heythereuniverse:

Crescent Moon (NASA, International Space Station Science, 11/03/07) | NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center

heythereuniverse:

Crescent Moon (NASA, International Space Station Science, 11/03/07) | NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center

(via fuckyeahcelestialthings)

spacettf:

The star cluster NGC 3293 by European Southern Observatory on Flickr.Tramite Flickr:
In this image from the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile young stars huddle together against a backdrop of clouds of glowing gas and lanes of dust. The star cluster, known as NGC 3293, would have been just a cloud of gas and dust itself about ten million years ago, but as stars began to form it became the bright group we see here. Clusters like this are celestial laboratories that allow astronomers to learn more about how stars evolve.
More information: www.eso.org/public/images/eso1422a/
Credit:
ESO/G. Beccari

spacettf:

The star cluster NGC 3293 by European Southern Observatory on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
In this image from the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile young stars huddle together against a backdrop of clouds of glowing gas and lanes of dust. The star cluster, known as NGC 3293, would have been just a cloud of gas and dust itself about ten million years ago, but as stars began to form it became the bright group we see here. Clusters like this are celestial laboratories that allow astronomers to learn more about how stars evolve.

More information: www.eso.org/public/images/eso1422a/

Credit:
ESO/G. Beccari

spacettf:

B59 Pipe Nebula 1920 by troypiggo on Flickr.

  HDW 3
  
  This image was obtained with the wide-field view of the Mosaic camera on the Mayall 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory.
  
  Hartl-Dengel-Weinberger 3 (HDW 3) is a large, ancient planetary nebula. Its distinctive braided shape is the result of the planetary nebula colliding with the interstellar gas around it as the nebula moves through the galaxy.
  
  The star that produced the planetary nebula is the faint bluish one just below and to the right of the bright star near the center of the image.The image was generated with observations in Hydrogen alpha (red) and Sulphur [S II] (blue) filters. In this image, North is up, East is to the left.

HDW 3

This image was obtained with the wide-field view of the Mosaic camera on the Mayall 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory.

Hartl-Dengel-Weinberger 3 (HDW 3) is a large, ancient planetary nebula. Its distinctive braided shape is the result of the planetary nebula colliding with the interstellar gas around it as the nebula moves through the galaxy.

The star that produced the planetary nebula is the faint bluish one just below and to the right of the bright star near the center of the image.The image was generated with observations in Hydrogen alpha (red) and Sulphur [S II] (blue) filters. In this image, North is up, East is to the left.

(via scinerds)

spacettf:

Antares_1920 by troypiggo on Flickr.