Everything

spacettf:

A cosmic hurricane by europeanspaceagency on Flickr.
spacettf:

Inside Sagittarius Dark Rift by Pegaso0970 on Flickr.
antikythera-astronomy:

This beautiful image is from NASA’s Chandra X-Ray Observatory. On the far right of the image, close to the middle vertically and below the bright white spot you can see a large glowing pink circle.
This is a spot that just recently started blasting out x-rays, actually 3000 times more than usual. NASA scientists suspect it’s a black hole that’s rich in heavy metals - something difficult to explain as this isn’t very typical of black holes.

antikythera-astronomy:

This beautiful image is from NASA’s Chandra X-Ray Observatory. On the far right of the image, close to the middle vertically and below the bright white spot you can see a large glowing pink circle.

This is a spot that just recently started blasting out x-rays, actually 3000 times more than usual. NASA scientists suspect it’s a black hole that’s rich in heavy metals - something difficult to explain as this isn’t very typical of black holes.

(via fuckyeahcelestialthings)

just—space:

M27: The Dumbbell Nebula [2150x1805]

just—space:

M27: The Dumbbell Nebula [2150x1805]

spacettf:

ngc7000 bicolour by dave.parker72 on Flickr.
afro-dominicano:

An Interacting Colossus

This picture, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), shows a galaxy known as NGC 6872 in the constellation of Pavo (The Peacock).
Its unusual shape is caused by its interactions with the smaller galaxy that can be seen just above NGC 6872, called IC 4970. They both lie roughly 300 million light-years away from Earth.
From tip to tip, NGC 6872 measures over 500 000 light-years across, making it the second largest spiral galaxy discovered to date. In terms of size it is beaten only by NGC 262, a galaxy that measures a mind-boggling 1.3 million light-years in diameter!
To put that into perspective, our own galaxy, the Milky Way, measures between 100 000 and 120 000 light-years across, making NGC 6872 about five times its size.

afro-dominicano:

An Interacting Colossus

This picture, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), shows a galaxy known as NGC 6872 in the constellation of Pavo (The Peacock).

Its unusual shape is caused by its interactions with the smaller galaxy that can be seen just above NGC 6872, called IC 4970. They both lie roughly 300 million light-years away from Earth.

From tip to tip, NGC 6872 measures over 500 000 light-years across, making it the second largest spiral galaxy discovered to date. In terms of size it is beaten only by NGC 262, a galaxy that measures a mind-boggling 1.3 million light-years in diameter!

To put that into perspective, our own galaxy, the Milky Way, measures between 100 000 and 120 000 light-years across, making NGC 6872 about five times its size.

(Source: spacetelescope.org, via fuckyeahcelestialthings)

spacettf:

Encroaching Shadow on Enceladus by Lunar and Planetary Institute on Flickr.
minus229k1:

Meet SN 1993J, a Type IIb supernova.Discovered by Hubble Space Telescope, it took place in a binary system in which two interacting stars caused the explosion. Being a supernova type IIb means,it contains much less hydrogen than typical supernovae. This is thought to be because of the companion star was taking most of the hydrogen that surrounded the exploding main star and continued to live as a super-hot helium-star.
Image Credit by NASA, ESA and G. Bacon (STScI)
Found at #NASA’s FB.

minus229k1:

Meet SN 1993J, a Type IIb supernova.
Discovered by Hubble Space Telescope, it took place in a binary system in which two interacting stars caused the explosion. Being a supernova type IIb means,it contains much less hydrogen than typical supernovae. This is thought to be because of the companion star was taking most of the hydrogen that surrounded the exploding main star and continued to live as a super-hot helium-star.

Image Credit by NASA, ESA and G. Bacon (STScI)

Found at #NASA’s FB.

(via fuckyeahcelestialthings)

afro-dominicano:


NGC 6589-90
by Robert Gendler

This rich nebula complex is located near the center of the galaxy where dust is ubiquitous and often partially obscures the view at visible wavelengths.
The two bright blue clouds are NGC 6589 and NGC 6590. The clouds represent scattered starlight from two imbedded young blue stars. The two bright stars are part of a loose cluster known as NGC 6595. The diffuse magenta cloud is a complex HII region which absorbs the energy from the nearby bright stars and releases it in the visible red light of excited hydrogen.
The HII clouds are known as IC 1283, IC 1284 and IC 4700. This region of our galaxy is rich with dust clouds and young stars which together produce the stunning reflection nebulae we see in the image.[**]

afro-dominicano:

NGC 6589-90

by Robert Gendler

This rich nebula complex is located near the center of the galaxy where dust is ubiquitous and often partially obscures the view at visible wavelengths.

The two bright blue clouds are NGC 6589 and NGC 6590. The clouds represent scattered starlight from two imbedded young blue stars. The two bright stars are part of a loose cluster known as NGC 6595. The diffuse magenta cloud is a complex HII region which absorbs the energy from the nearby bright stars and releases it in the visible red light of excited hydrogen.

The HII clouds are known as IC 1283, IC 1284 and IC 4700. This region of our galaxy is rich with dust clouds and young stars which together produce the stunning reflection nebulae we see in the image.[**]

(via fuckyeahcelestialthings)

astronomicalwonders:

Turbulence in a Star Forming Region
The nebula’s sparkling centerpiece is a giant, young star cluster named NGC 2070, only 2 million years old. Its stellar inhabitants number roughly 500,000. The cluster is a hotbed for young, massive stars. The cluster’s dense core, known as R136, is packed with some of the heftiest stars found in the nearby universe.
The cluster’s core is home to more than 10,000 stars. Several of them may be over 100 times more massive than our Sun. These hefty stars are destined to pop off, like a string of firecrackers, as supernovas in a few million years. Only two or three of the hottest stars in R136 are providing 50 percent of the radiation in the cluster.
30 Doradus is the brightest, nearby star-forming region and home to the most massive stars in our cosmic neighborhood of about 25 galaxies. The nebula is close enough to Earth that Hubble can resolve individual stars, giving astronomers important information about the stars’ birth and evolution. 30 Doradus resides 170,000 light-years away in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small, satellite galaxy of our Milky Way.
Credit: NASA, ESA

astronomicalwonders:

Turbulence in a Star Forming Region

The nebula’s sparkling centerpiece is a giant, young star cluster named NGC 2070, only 2 million years old. Its stellar inhabitants number roughly 500,000. The cluster is a hotbed for young, massive stars. The cluster’s dense core, known as R136, is packed with some of the heftiest stars found in the nearby universe.

The cluster’s core is home to more than 10,000 stars. Several of them may be over 100 times more massive than our Sun. These hefty stars are destined to pop off, like a string of firecrackers, as supernovas in a few million years. Only two or three of the hottest stars in R136 are providing 50 percent of the radiation in the cluster.

30 Doradus is the brightest, nearby star-forming region and home to the most massive stars in our cosmic neighborhood of about 25 galaxies. The nebula is close enough to Earth that Hubble can resolve individual stars, giving astronomers important information about the stars’ birth and evolution. 30 Doradus resides 170,000 light-years away in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small, satellite galaxy of our Milky Way.

Credit: NASA, ESA

(via fuckyeahcelestialthings)

the-wolf-and-moon:

30 Doradus Nebula

the-wolf-and-moon:

30 Doradus Nebula

(via fuckyeahcelestialthings)

fuckyeahcelestialthings:

NGC 3081

fuckyeahcelestialthings:

(Source: alihikaua)

just—space:

Shadows and Plumes Across Enceladus [1016x592]

just—space:

Shadows and Plumes Across Enceladus [1016x592]

spacettf:

Milky Way from San Lameer South Africa by dave.parker72 on Flickr.